Professor Dame Henrietta L. Moore

Professor Henrietta L. Moore is the Founder and Director of the Institute for Global Prosperity and the Chair in Culture Philosophy and Design at University College London (UCL). A leading global thinker on prosperity, Professor Moore challenges traditional economic models of growth arguing that to flourish communities, businesses and governments need to engage with diversity and work within environmental limits.

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In The Media

Henrietta Moore: The new unitary authorities should be outriders for further devolution

Media

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"We are being suffocated by fossil fuel emissions on a daily basis"

Commentary

Recent research shows that Lebanon could witness an increase of 1.2 to 3.2 degrees in temperatures in areas that are already very arid and suffer from water shortage. An increase in temperature and a decrease in precipitation will have particular impact on the electricity sector - a higher cooling demand in summer and increased consumption for electricity. Rising sea levels and water scarcity in Lebanon could lead to internal climate migration and mass displacement from rural to coastal regions affecting agricultural output, jobs and livelihoods. The economic situation in the cities that are already prone to poverty, illiteracy and unemployment could become worse.

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Measuring the Good Life

Commentary

At the IGP we fundamentally believe that citizens and communities should be at the centre of efforts to reimagine prosperity and to define what matters to them for a good quality of life. We do not assume what matters; we ask people to tell us what matters to them.

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Latest Research

Rebuilding the post-Covid-19 economy through an industrial strategy that secures livelihoods

UK

The Covid-19 crisis has further exacerbated the insecurity of livelihoods in the UK. This commentary reflects on what resources the UK has to fulfil the calls to ‘build back better,’ to transform the economy to prioritise health and wellbeing over economic growth.

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Imagining a welfare state that supports secure livelihoods

UK

The pandemic has clearly exposed the inability of our existing welfare system to provide people with an adequate safety net to navigate times of crisis. The significant rise in food poverty, debt and extreme financial vulnerability caused by the pandemic is clear evidence of this.

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Identifying and understanding local priorities for developing an ‘Economy of Belonging’: A case study of eight areas in the UK

UK

The recent outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic has reanimated the discussion of socio-economic inequalities and livelihoods’ insecurity across the UK. There is a clear disconnect between policymaking frameworks, macroeconomic theories, and empirical exercises using national and regional statistical data, on the one hand, with the lived experiences of individuals and communities at the local level, on the other.

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Events

APPG on Limits to Growth-Rebuilding Prosperity

Thursday 29 April, 2021

"We cannot hope to level up and deal with the growing divide in poverty and prosperity until we cure our fetish for GDP, accept the failure of current policy making and stem the decline in civic and political participation"

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Books

Promoting Health Book

Promoting the Health of Children and Young People: Setting a Research Agenda

Henrietta L. Moore

This paper summarises and updates the report of one of the seven Expert Working Groups established by the UK’s Health Education Authority (HEA) in October 1996 to look at the potential for health promotion with key populations – in this case that of children and young people. It seeks to establish a revitalised agenda for research into the health and wellbeing of children and young people in the UK.

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Book Hlm The Mutual State

The Mutual State and How to Build It

Henrietta L. Moore and Ed Mayo

This report draws together the findings from a virtual think-tank on mutualisation, designed to test, challenge and improve the core approach, running over six months up to May 2002.

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