'The Health of Children and Young People: Setting a Research Agenda'

Hm 0067

Published: Thursday 15 April, 1999



This paper summarises and updates the report of one of the seven Expert Working Groups established by the UK’s Health Education Authority (HEA) in October 1996 to look at the potential for health promotion with key populations – in this case that of children and young people. It seeks to establish a revitalised agenda for research into the health and wellbeing of children and young people in the UK. The article describes how contemporary sociological understandings of children and childhood have implications not only for the way in which health and health promotion strategies are conceived, designed and implemented, but for our understanding of what health and health promotion initiatives should constitute. The article calls for more research into children’s and young people’s understandings of health, and the linguistic idioms in which those understandings are expressed, as well as into the social networks and social action spaces in which children and young people operate. It argues for better integration of research and policies concerning the health of children and young people, to include institutions, agencies and organisations that have an impact on the health of children and young people

Moore, H.L. (1999) The health of children and young people: a new agenda. Health Education, 99(4), pp.161-169, https://doi.org/10.1108/09654289910284599

Share this article:




Recent Posts

What is Prosperity for Africa?

Media

On 6 December 2018, Prof. Henrietta Moore delivered the 2018 Stephen Ellis Annual Lecture titled ‘What is prosperity for Africa?’

Read More

In the face of climate change, ranking states by prosperity invites disaster

Commentary

Forget standings that put wealthy countries ahead of poor ones on the path to development, we’re all in this together

Read More

Brexit Is Making Us Blind To The Real Jobs Crisis

Commentary

The response to this dawning new era of mass redundancy has been building slowly in recent years, but arguably in the wrong direction

Read More