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‘My Perfect Country’: UN Debate

World Service programme which analyses ground-breaking global policies, is part of a sitting session of the UN’s Economic and Social Council

Published: Monday 6 February, 2017



In a radio first, the World Service programme which analyses ground-breaking global policies, is part of a sitting session of the UN’s Economic and Social Council and includes contributions from some of the 58 delegate countries.

The programme is introduced by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, and features contributions from Gerald Abila, a Ugandan lawyer who has introduced a free legal advice scheme through mobiles and social media, KC Mishra who has tackled sanitation issues in India with innovative approaches to toilets and human waste disposal, Monica Araya who has been one of the driving forces behind Costa Rica’s approach to renewable energy, and Hannes Astok who has been pushing the boundaries of the digital state in Estonia. Also joining the discussion is internet entrepreneur Martha Lane Fox.

Visit the My Perfect Country: UN Debate-site to listen to the episode.



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