Hm 0067

‘Difference and recognition: Postmillennial identities and social justice.'

Published: Wednesday 18 April, 2001



Last year the editors of Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society invited feminists worldwide to comment on the millennial transition. Representing a disciplinary and generational range of writers, the resulting collection is at turns inspiring, troubling, provocative, despairing, celebratory. Some of the essays give voice to anxieties, others are more hopeful; some reflect back, others look forward. Many of these fifty-plus short essays speak to themes of gender, nationality, global independence, transnational corporate domination, racial and ethnic identities, and complex intersections among these systems. Readers will find eye-opening writing that is thoughtful, committed, and passionate about feminist futures.

Moore, Henrietta L. (2001) ‘Difference and recognition: Postmillennial identities and social justice.' In (eds) C. Allen and J. Howard Feminisms at a Millennium. University of Chicago Press.

Share this article:




Recent Posts

Panel Discussion: Rebuilding Macroeconomics after the Pandemic

Media

Financial Crisis, nationalism and COVID-19 are all socio-economic pandemics in the last decade. Each one starts in a small corner of our world, then spreads across continents in a very short space of time. Each one is a surprise, and each one catches us unprepared. If we are to be prepared for the next pandemic or crisis, we need a different approach to economics.

Read More

Post-Covid Live 5: Farming the Future

Media

Post-Covid Live addresses the nature of society, the kind of government and the form of economy we will need and want after the crisis. It is no longer possible to endorse the market as the primary mechanism for creating value and solving problems.

Read More

Post-Covid Live 4: Cascading the Positive

Media

Post-Covid Live addresses the nature of society, the kind of government and the form of economy we will need and want after the crisis. It is no longer possible to endorse the market as the primary mechanism for creating value and solving problems.

Read More