Moore, Henrietta L. (2013) ‘Forms of Knowing and Un-knowing: Secrets about Society, Sexuality and God in Northern Kenya’ in (eds) R. Ryan-Flood & R. Gill. Secrecy and silence in the research process: feminist reflections.

secrecy cover

Moore, Henrietta L. ‘Forms of Knowing and Un-knowing: Secrets about Society, Sexuality and God in Northern Kenya’ in: Ryan-Flood, R., & Gill, R. (Eds.). (2013). Secrecy and silence in the research process: feminist reflections. Routledge.

‘The discipline of anthropology has a long history of fascination with secrecy and secret knowledge, as exemplified in the very many studies of secret societies, esoteric knowledge and initiation rituals. In many such analyses, secrecy and secret knowledge are very often linked to political power and the maintenance of control of men over women and elders over youth. Anthropologists thus recognize the mutually constitutive relations of power and knowledge in the contexts in which they work […]. What has been given less attention is the manner in which the idea of secrets dominates the imaginative construction of the domain of anthropology itself and acts as the evident, but nonetheless concealed, centre around which the desire of the anthropologist circulates […]”

In this book chapter Henrietta L. Moore discusses the ways in which secrecy and silence have defined her research in an African community over the last 25 years.

Visit publisher’s website: Secrecy and silence in the research process: feminist reflections