Moore, Henrietta L. (2004) ‘Global anxieties: concept-metaphors and pre-theoretical commitments in anthropology’. Anthropological Theory, Vol. 4(1): 71-88.

This article begins by interrogating the problem of the globaland the local in anthropology, and asks howtheir interconnections might be theorized. When anthropologists call for an examination of the global inconcrete terms, they often fail to appreciatethe place of ‘concept-metaphors’ whose purpose is to maintain ambiguity and a productive tensionbetween universal claims and specific historicalcontexts. ‘The global’ is just such a concept-metaphor, a space of theoretical abstraction andprocesses, experiences and connections in theworld, important not only to social scientists but now partof most people’s imagined and experiencedworlds. In this article, I examine pre-theoreticalcommitments common in anthropology that emphasize ‘thelocal’ via participant-observation, whichbecomes elided with ethnography. I suggest thatanthropology begin to ‘methodologize’ the relation between the global and the local by reviewingseveral approaches to these problems.

Moore, Henrietta L. (2004) ‘Global anxieties: concept-metaphors and pre-theoretical commitments in anthropology’. Anthropological Theory, Vol. 4(1): 71-88.